Remote working during the COVID-19 pandemic: A study on the emotional and relational experience and on the well-being of Italian university scholars and clerks

Authors

  • Ciro Esposito Department of Humanities, University of Naples Federico II
  • Barbara Agueli Department of Humanities, University of Naples Federico II
  • Caterina Arcidiacono Department of Humanities, University of Naples Federico II
  • Immacolata Di Napoli Department of Humanities, University of Naples Federico II

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.13133/2724-2943/17578

Abstract

Introduction: This study investigated the emotions, relational experience and well-being of university scholars and clerks who continued their activities working remotely during the Italian lockdown period (March and April 2020).

Methods: Eighty-seven workers (55% scholars and 45% university clerks) filled out an online quali-quantitative questionnaire about their work remotely during the lockdown. Qualitative data were analyzed through Grounded Theory Methodology. Then cross-tabs were created to intertwine the code groups that emerged with work role and gender of participants and frequencies were analyzed by Chi square test.  Data were also analyzed through Univariate Analysis of Variance (ANOVA).

Results: The results showed that scholars consider remote working mainly as a critical issue, while clerks see it more as a resource. Clerks more frequently reported negative affectivity such as anxiety, fear and anger, while scholars more frequently reported loneliness. Regarding interpersonal relationships, no significant differences between scholars and clerks were observed. Moreover, clerks reported lower physical, psychological, economic and overall well-being compared to scholars.

Conclusions: This study highlights the importance of the mattering role of human relations in work activities. Without taking into account the emotional and relational needs of the workers, remote working can have negative effects on well-being.

Keywords: remote working; COVID-19 pandemic; well-being; affects; Grounded Theory Methodology

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Published

2022-04-05

How to Cite

Esposito, C., Agueli, B., Arcidiacono, C., & Di Napoli, I. (2022). Remote working during the COVID-19 pandemic: A study on the emotional and relational experience and on the well-being of Italian university scholars and clerks. Psychology Hub, 39(1), 47–54. https://doi.org/10.13133/2724-2943/17578